Learning about Beekeeping

lowering heating costs


On Saturday the 3rd, I went to the beeyard to feed one of my hives sugar syrup. They hadn’t filled out the frames as well as they could have, and it’s important for winter survival that they are full to maximum capacity. So, despite not wanting refined sugar in my life anymore, back in it came. In the top picture you see the hive with a honey super on top – I had to leave a space for the ziplock bag of sugar syrup between the frames and the lid. After Ken’s comment on a previous post, I thought I better follow his recommendations, so I built myself a rim. I went to the beeyard today to feed them again, and switch over to the rim. That’s the next pic, showing the rim I made, and the inner cover on top:


It makes more sense to have the least amount of empty space possible, because the bees have to heat up all the space in their hive. More space to heat means more energy expended by the bees, so they’ll be eating more honey, and as a result they’ll have less honey for the winter. The less honey they have for the winter, the more likely they are to die before the nectar flow in the spring.
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2 Responses to lowering heating costs

  • Have you put on an entrance reducer? I would. It just helps to keep some of the heat in and they don't get as much cold air blowing in.

    Ken

  • No, but I'm 'driving past' on my way to a friend's place today, so I'll pop those in. Thanks!!!!